Boat Loans – PSP Book http://pspbook.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://pspbook.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Boat Loans – PSP Book http://pspbook.com/ 32 32 Holiday Spirit: Christmas Ship Parade Returns to St. Helens | New https://pspbook.com/holiday-spirit-christmas-ship-parade-returns-to-st-helens-new/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/holiday-spirit-christmas-ship-parade-returns-to-st-helens-new/ The Columbia River will sparkle in early December as the annual Christmas Ship Parade returns to the St. Helens waterfront with a dazzling display of Christmas lights on Saturday, December 10. The Christmas Ship Parade begins at 6 p.m. on December 10 at the docks in St. Helens City. Courtesy of the City of St. […]]]>

The Columbia River will sparkle in early December as the annual Christmas Ship Parade returns to the St. Helens waterfront with a dazzling display of Christmas lights on Saturday, December 10.






The Christmas Ship Parade begins at 6 p.m. on December 10 at the docks in St. Helens City.




The Christmas Ships Parade is operated by Christmas Ships, Inc., a non-profit organization. The parade began in 1954 and is an annual holiday tradition on the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

The event attracts both new and returning parade participants. Organizers said participants tend to return every year – several have been marching for more than 40 years and many have made it a multi-generational tradition, with children of previous participants returning with their own boats and families to parade.

Story

The Christmas Ship Parade began with a decorated sailboat in 1954 and has since grown to over 70 participating boats. The all-volunteer-run event lasts 15 nights in December and travels the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in the Portland metro area, providing communities the opportunity to view it from the riverfront, restaurants, parks, neighborhoods and roadsides along rivers.

According to Chelsea Rose, a member of the Oregon Heritage Commission and former chair, the parade’s designation as an Oregon Heritage Tradition recognizes the traditions that have helped define the state’s character.

“The Christmas Ship Parade is tied to the importance of the river to Oregon’s heritage and identity,” she told The Chronicle in a 2020 interview. watch it every year.”

Parade organizers said Christmas senders spent countless hours on the cold waters of the river bringing smiles to young and old.

Volunteers dedicate more than 3,000 hours to trainings, meetings, outreach, logistics and actual parade time. They hold up to three meet and greet events at different locations where community members can see the boats up close, meet boat owners and learn about boat safety, according to parade organizers.

The Christmas Ship Parade will be launched from the docks in the city of St. Helens.

Parade organizers list the following outdoor viewing locations in Columbia County for the Christmas Ship Parade:

  • Columbia Courthouse – Above St. Helens City Docks
  • Columbia View Park – South of the Courthouse parking lot
  • Sand Island – Access the river from St. Helens
  • Caples House Museum – 1925 First St, Columbia City
  • Pixie Park – Columbia City

Events on the square

A holiday celebration will also take place at the Columbia County Courthouse Plaza in the St. Helens Riverfront District.







Plaza Activities

Activities on December 10 include a walk and salute with Santa Claus, photos with alpacas, and live music in Plaza Square.


Activities on December 10 will begin at 5:30 p.m. with a walk and greet Santa Claus with his elves. There will be photo ops with live holiday alpacas and festive decorations in the plaza. The Christmas Ship Parade starts from the city’s docks at 6 p.m. The full schedule includes:

  • 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Walk and wave with Santa Claus and his elves in Plaza Square.
  • 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. photos with the holiday alpacas in Plaza Square.
  • 5:45-8 p.m. Live Holiday Music with Tom Grant and Alyssa Schwary at Plaza Square.
  • 6:00 p.m. Parade of Christmas Ships at St. Helens City Docks.

This event is hosted by the City of St. Helens with tourism support from Cascadia Home Loans (Matt McHugh, NMLS#116407), Wauna Federal Credit Union, The Jane Garcia Team of Keller Williams, Big Food Cart and Brew, 503 Distilling, Best Western Oak Meadows Inn and Sand Island Campground.

More information about the parade can be found at www.christmasships.org/.

]]>
How some Southwest Florida business owners are recovering, nearly two months after Hurricane Ian https://pspbook.com/how-some-southwest-florida-business-owners-are-recovering-nearly-two-months-after-hurricane-ian/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 01:20:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/how-some-southwest-florida-business-owners-are-recovering-nearly-two-months-after-hurricane-ian/ After Hurricane Ian hit Southwest Florida in late September, Zac “Captain” Varner had to wait seven days to see if his company, Peace River Charters, was engulfed by the storm. Rain and winds from Hurricane Ian caused record flooding along the Peace River that submerged all six buildings at its Arcadia-based headquarters. “Total devastation,” he […]]]>

After Hurricane Ian hit Southwest Florida in late September, Zac “Captain” Varner had to wait seven days to see if his company, Peace River Charters, was engulfed by the storm.

Rain and winds from Hurricane Ian caused record flooding along the Peace River that submerged all six buildings at its Arcadia-based headquarters.

“Total devastation,” he said. “Naturally, because there are so many components to my business, it took a lot of thought and planning to figure out where to start.”

Stationed at two sites along the Peace River in DeSoto County, its crew specializes in various river and land excursions by airboat, horseback and “swamp buggy,” a truck-like swamp-crossing vehicle freak. The ten-year-old business also offers cabin rentals, a bait and tackle shop, and an alligator exhibit.

“We’re kind of a one-stop outdoor destination store for Southwest Florida,” he said.

Before Hurricane Ian made landfall, Varner and his crew had to evacuate Dale, a 13-foot-long, 1,200-pound alligator, to higher ground. He is one of eleven alligators that is part of the on-site exhibit at Peace River Charters in Arcadia, Florida.

Varner said November usually marks the start of their busy season which lasts until April. Typically, this contributes to lower unemployment in southwest Florida counties.

But in a labor update on Friday, the head of labor statistics and economic research for the Economic Opportunity Department said he “expects these numbers go the other way.”

“This is the first month that data will show impacts from Hurricane Ian,” Jimmy Heckman said.

Statewide data shows unemployment rose to 2.7% in October from 2.5% in September.

Meanwhile, the labor force as a whole continues to grow, with Heckman saying record migration to the state of Florida is a likely contributor to the steady increase in the labor force in recent months.

READ MORE: Florida unemployment rate soars after Hurricane Ian

Varner said he typically employs about 20 full-time people. With facilities damaged and river tours halted until further notice, his entire team has moved to part-time work, and he’s had to get creative to keep them on the payroll.

“So in the month of October a lot of our work took place outside of the river tours,” he said.

“We don’t have the facilities right now. We don’t have our bait and tackle store. We haven’t opened our alligator shows yet. You have to manage hours – and naturally – trying to give people as much work as we can.”

Varner negotiated with DeSoto County and other partners to contract odd jobs for his crew, such as clearing debris and maintaining solar array fields.

He said the Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program, activated by Governor Ron DeSantis to help small businesses recover, kept his business afloat through October. It also relies on a physical disaster loan, distributed by the US Small Business Administration (SBA), to get through.

Varner said the prospect of rebuilding after a hurricane is made darker by volatility in material and labor costs since the COVID-19 pandemic.

“It’s definitely a big concern,” he said. “It’s hard to really put a number on what those costs are going to be because everything fluctuates constantly.”

According to SBA data, more than $900 million in physical disaster and economic injury loans have been approved for small business owners recovering from Ian across the state. Business owners in the Greater Tampa Bay Area counties account for more than $119 million in loans, with 114 recipients in DeSoto County at just over $6 million in special disaster loans.

“I feel like we’re resilient as a business, and we’ve had to weather some natural disasters and pandemics before,” Varner said. “It’s definitely a challenge for our people – you go from being a well-oiled machine to managing controlled chaos.”

Gabriella Paul covers the stories of people living paycheck to paycheck in the greater Tampa Bay area for WUSF. She is also a member of the Report for America body. Here’s how you can share your story with her.

]]>
Student loan refinance rate: November 15, 2022 https://pspbook.com/student-loan-refinance-rate-november-15-2022/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 19:03:29 +0000 https://pspbook.com/student-loan-refinance-rate-november-15-2022/ Insider’s experts choose the best products and services to help you make informed decisions with your money (here’s how). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners, however, our opinions are our own. Terms apply to offers listed on this page. According to Credible, average interest rates on refinanced student loans are up […]]]>

Insider’s experts choose the best products and services to help you make informed decisions with your money (here’s how). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners, however, our opinions are our own. Terms apply to offers listed on this page.

According to Credible, average interest rates on refinanced student loans are up from two weeks ago. Rates on 5-year undergraduate variable loans are unchanged, but are still at yearly highs.

The average 10-year fixed student loan rate for borrowers with a credit score below 680 is 7.35%. This rate is higher than the average rate of 6.42% for borrowers of all credit ratings. Usually, the higher your credit score, the lower the rate you can receive.

As you can see in the charts below, rates have skyrocketed over the past 12 months. Federal student loan rates for 2022-23 are the highest in nearly two decades. These new rates don’t directly affect private student loan rates, but private rates may go up because they don’t have to stay so low to compete with federal loan rates. The rise in student loan rates comes amid a general rise in consumer credit costs, with the Federal Reserve raising base interest rates six times this year to keep inflation in check.

Student loan refinance companies featured by Insider

Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous/next navigation options.

Chevron icon It indicates an expandable section or menu, or sometimes previous/next navigation options.

APR

Variable: 2.49% – 8.24%, Fixed: 3.99% – 8.24%

Editor’s Note

4.5/5

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

APR

Variable: 2.50 – 8.65% with AutoPay, Fixed: 3.99 – 8.49%

Editor’s Note

3.5/5

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

APR

Variable: 3.24% – 7.99% APR with AutoPay, Fixed: 3.99% – 8.99% APR with AutoPay

Editor’s Note

3.5/5

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

A five pointed star

Variable 5-Year Student Loan Refinance Rates

5-year undergraduate variable loan rates remained at yearly highs last week, standing at 8.79%. This rate is more than 6% higher than 12 months ago, significantly increasing the overall cost to borrowers.

Graduate loan rates are significantly lower than undergraduate student rates. Graduation rates were up 20 basis points from two weeks ago and 60 basis points from a year ago.

Fixed 10-Year Student Loan Refinance Rates

Undergraduate and graduate rates are up from two weeks ago. Undergraduate rates rose 56 basis points, while graduate rates rose 16 basis points.

In general, the rates go up. This makes the overall cost of borrowing much more expensive.

Student loan interest rates by credit score

Your interest rate will generally improve with a higher credit score. Other components of your financial situation also have an impact on your rate. The table below shows 10-year fixed student loan rates by credit score:

Frequently Asked Questions

Refinancing your student loans could get you a lower rate. You can also switch from a fixed rate loan to a variable rate loan or change the term of your loan. A different term can allow you to spread the costs over a longer period for lower monthly payments. However, you will pay more total interest.

In the short term, it will. Lenders will do a thorough investigation to check your credit history when you apply for a new loan. This will temporarily affect your credit score.

Also, when you refinance, your original loan is closed and a new one is opened. Part of your credit score is based on your payment history, so establishing a new record of reliable payments can be difficult.

However, if you continue to make timely and reliable payments, your credit score will likely rise accordingly.

Your credit history is the most important factor in your chances of refinancing approval. If you have a bad credit rating, it will be more difficult for you to get a new loan. But you may be able to use a co-signer to increase your chances of approval.

]]>
Armistice Day Blizzard nearly claimed teenage Bud Grant among its duck hunt victims https://pspbook.com/armistice-day-blizzard-nearly-claimed-teenage-bud-grant-among-its-duck-hunt-victims/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 23:24:48 +0000 https://pspbook.com/armistice-day-blizzard-nearly-claimed-teenage-bud-grant-among-its-duck-hunt-victims/ Early on Nov. 11, 1940 — 82 years ago on Friday — the dryland hurricane that would become known as the Armistice Day blizzard gathered near Kansas City and targeted the Mississippi River Valley. Hundreds of waterfowl from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa had set out at the start of the holiday — now called Veterans […]]]>

Early on Nov. 11, 1940 — 82 years ago on Friday — the dryland hurricane that would become known as the Armistice Day blizzard gathered near Kansas City and targeted the Mississippi River Valley.

Hundreds of waterfowl from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa had set out at the start of the holiday — now called Veterans Day — in hopes that long skeins of mallards and webs would fly south to the rear of the impending burst.

When the skies finally cleared two days later, around 25 duck hunters were among the 154 people killed by the storm. Thousands of cattle also died in 20-foot snowdrifts and more than a million farmed turkeys perished.

Bud Grant, now 95, the retired Vikings coach, was barely a teenager in 1940 and is one of the few duck hunters alive today to survive the storm.

Attending Superior High School, Wis., Grant had friends who played football, basketball, and baseball with him. But he only had one friend, Bill Blank, who hunted, and on the weekends the two hiking trails around Superior carried their .22s and .410s, plinking grouse, squirrels and rabbits.

Grant and Blank had taken a break the day before the blizzard enveloped northwestern Wisconsin. An older friend, Phil Cross, had invited them to go duck hunting on Yellow Lake, about 60 miles south of the boys’ home in Superior. Often, at the end of the season, the pochards or blue bills frequented Yellow Lake and the three hunters were eager to shoot them.

“It was a different time and our equipment was poor,” Grant recalled the other day. . It was our hunting gear.”

Cross had rented a cabin on Yellow Lake with a wood stove. But Grant was too excited to sleep that night, and when well before dawn Cross lit kerosene lamps in the cabin to prepare breakfast, he and the two young hunters were soon out, rowing a hired boat on the lake.

As they did, the gathering morning light revealed an uneven sky. The winds were light and the rowing was easy. Adding to the hunters’ excitement, the wingbeats of as-yet-unknown ducks punctuated the otherwise calm morning.

Unbeknownst to the hunters as they rowed, a low pressure system over Iowa had deepened and would eventually produce the lowest readings on record at that time in Charles City, Iowa at 28, 92 inches, and in Duluth, 28.66 inches.

“We set up our decoys and shot ducks,” Grant said. “Then after a while Phil said he wanted to go back to the cabin for a nap. So Bill and I rowed him back. Then we rowed across the lake again to our decoys and continued to hunt.

At this time, waterfowlers on the Mississippi River near La Crosse, Wis., and Winona, Minnesota, and north and south of those towns might have sensed that the November winds they hoped would bring ducks on their decoys presaged not only a good shot but danger. Temperatures had been in the 40s and 50s that morning, and some hunters had climbed into their skiffs in shirt sleeves. Then the rains came, and the sleet. And soon after, snow and wind.

“Bill and I were shooting at some ducks,” Grant said, “when all of a sudden the wind picked up from the northwest and we were covered in ducks! The wind was blowing harder and harder. did, we shot more and more ducks. We couldn’t get some of them back because the waves were too big. Eventually, we thought we’d better get out of there.”

As Grant struggled with the boat’s oars, the wooden craft lurched and lurched and was finally thrown against the windward shore. Abandoning the boat, the two hunters entered water up to their shins and as quickly as the water rushed over the tops of their curly shoe covers.

They would circle the lake to reach the cabin, they decided, and they set off.

“We got halfway there, but it was swampy and Bill fell waist deep in water,” Grant said. “That and the wind and the snow got too much and eventually he said he couldn’t go anymore. There was a train line nearby and I tucked him in next to him and left him.

When Grant reached the cabin, he stumbled through the door and, half-frozen, told Cross where he had left Blank. Alarmed, Cross rushed into the whiteout as Grant, his clothes soaked, stripped down to his clothes and put on a pair of Cross’s waders while stoking the fire in the woodstove.


Half an hour later, Cross returned to the cabin with Blank. Once warmed up, the three hunters fled.

“We had no way of knowing if the storm was going to get worse or better, but we couldn’t stay in the cabin,” Grant said. “We didn’t have enough food or firewood.”

In Cross’ car, he and Blank and Grant slipped and skidded down the narrow road from the station to the highway. 35, the north-south route that would take them back to Superior.

Crawling at low speeds while scanning the maelstrom for the two-lane tarmac, the three hunters hadn’t come far when they rounded a bend to find two cars blocking the road, stuck in snowdrifts.

“We had no way to turn back and we didn’t know where we were,” Grant said. “There were two people in each of the cars. To save gas and stay warm, we all piled into one car, some of us sitting on the others’ laps. We were running the car by intermittently to warm us up, which we did for the rest of the day and night.’

Morning came and with it even deeper snow piled up around the cars. Grant does not remember how the decision was made. But perhaps because he was young and fit and also because he still wore Cross’ waders and could keep his feet dry, he was picked to go for help.

“Otherwise we were going to die there,” he said.

Tightening his canvas coat, hat and gloves, Grant got out of the car in the deep snow and headed north along what he thought was the road. Spruce, pines, and balsam flanked him, and he walked for an indeterminate time but probably for at least an hour before seeking shelter among the trees but finding none.

With his face covered in ice and snow, he trudged on and in time he came to a crossroads and in the northeast corner of the intersection was a gas station with two pumps. There were no lights on and no cars at the pumps. Still, Grant knocked on the door and a woman and her young daughter answered. The woman’s husband was away from the Superior shipyards where he worked, she said. But Grant could come in.

“There was heat and food and I was safe,” Grant said. “But there was no communication. My parents, I’m sure, feared that I was dead. I stayed with the woman and her daughter for two and a half days. During this time, Bill and Phil and the others had frozen to death, I was sure.

What Grant didn’t know was that not far from where the cars had gotten stuck, a farmer had shot a deer and hung it in his shed.

Worried that his family would need food during the storm, the same day Grant walked for help, the farmer walked through the snow to shoot the deer. As he did, he saw the cars stuck.

“The farmer took Bill, Phil and the others to his home, where they also stayed for two and a half days,” Grant said. “They ate all the deer during that time.”

Grant’s father, Harry Peter Grant Sr., was a senior firefighter, and when a plow finally headed south to clear the highway. On the 35th, he commandeered a fire truck to follow him. The plow, fire truck, Cross and Blank, and the others emerged after the storm at the two-pump gas station around the same time.

“Seeing me, my dad hugged me so tightly,” Grant said. “I had never seen my father cry before. But he cried and cried. He tried to pay the woman to feed me and keep me safe, but she wouldn’t accept the money.

“Later, when we got home, my dad sent her two $20 bills. My dad was making $100 a month, so it was a lot of money for him. But he wanted to pay her. The woman replied that with the $40 his family bought a turkey for Thanksgiving, having it instead of venison, which they’ve probably eaten all year.


After graduating from high school, Grant joined the Navy and Blank joined the Army. They remained friends, and when they were released, they pooled their $200 of money, took out a bank loan, and bought hunting land together in northwest Wisconsin.

“It wasn’t long before Bill wanted to get married and needed the money, so he asked me to buy him out,” Grant said. “So I took out another loan and paid it off.

“At the time, I was playing ball at the U and I paid off the loans by exchanging tickets to Gophers games.”

Grant still owns the land.

]]>
Water infrastructure $$$ – – The Adirondack Almanac https://pspbook.com/water-infrastructure-the-adirondack-almanac/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 19:58:19 +0000 https://pspbook.com/water-infrastructure-the-adirondack-almanac/ During a flurry of pre-election announcements last week, I took particular note of a pair on drinking water infrastructure. The announcements mark what promises to be a generational investment in sewage treatment plants, sewage collection systems and public water supply. In a magazine article earlier this year, I described over $500 million in water infrastructure […]]]>

During a flurry of pre-election announcements last week, I took particular note of a pair on drinking water infrastructure.

The announcements mark what promises to be a generational investment in sewage treatment plants, sewage collection systems and public water supply. In a magazine article earlier this year, I described over $500 million in water infrastructure needs in the Adirondack Park.

The federal bipartisan infrastructure act, combined with pandemic response funds, promises more than $400 million for New York in the first year and more than $1 billion in total in future years. On Thursday, the governor’s office announced the first federally funded drinking water grants in Newburgh and Liberty. Federal authorities recently released $207 million in New York City clean water funds.

According to the release, “An additional $220 million is expected to be granted to New York City through the bipartisan Infrastructure Act…for clean water projects later this fall, complementing $45 million in regular federal funding for infrastructure in New York City. drinking water this year. State officials have estimated they will fund $438 million in loans and grants this fiscal year.

Leaders and advocates of the Adirondacks place the region’s infrastructure needs in the larger context of protecting the water that so many people use to swim, fish, paddle and drink. And many small communities don’t have the resources to fund the projects themselves.

Last week, the state also announced a slew of other water infrastructure projects that will receive funding, including some in the north of the country:

  • $5.3 million in interest-free financing and nearly $670,000 in grant money to the Town of Ausable to rehabilitate the sewage treatment system;

  • $4.8 million for improving the water supply to Tupper Lake;

  • $5 million for the upgrade of the Willsboro water treatment plant;

  • $834,000 for Champlain wastewater treatment upgrades;

  • $3.6 million to improve Moriah’s sewer collection.

On Tuesday, voters picked another major piece of the funding puzzle. Advocates hope the approval of the proposed $4.2 billion Environmental Bonds Act will complement the massive investment in critical infrastructure.

Much of the proceeds from the bond act could supplement federal dollars spent on drinking water projects in the state. It would also open up funds for communities to reduce flood risk and restore natural systems. We will continue to explore what specific water-related projects might be underway.

In other news, the Adirondack Park agency is seeking more information on a proposed expansion of the old Hickok Boat Livery on Fish Creek Ponds. Nearby owners have pushed back on the project, fueling a wider debate over whether the APA should consider the broader impacts of marina expansion on state lands and waters.

Top photo: Construction work in 2014 to replace the old water pipes in Lake Saranac. Explorer file photo by Mike Lynch

Editor’s Note: This first appeared in Zach’s weekly “Water Line” newsletter (updated with yesterday’s bond law results). Click here to sign up for his newsletter and/or others in our list of daily and weekly offers.

]]>
As health care systems grow, independent primary care physicians are a dying breed | Healthcare/Hospitals https://pspbook.com/as-health-care-systems-grow-independent-primary-care-physicians-are-a-dying-breed-healthcare-hospitals/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/as-health-care-systems-grow-independent-primary-care-physicians-are-a-dying-breed-healthcare-hospitals/ A little white schnauzer named Oakley, half a dozen peacefully floating seahorses, and Arleen, a nurse who has worked there for 23 years, greet patients at Dr. Alan Yager’s Metairie private practice. While most of his 800 patients come to see him in the cozy office tucked away in the more closed grounds of East […]]]>

A little white schnauzer named Oakley, half a dozen peacefully floating seahorses, and Arleen, a nurse who has worked there for 23 years, greet patients at Dr. Alan Yager’s Metairie private practice.

While most of his 800 patients come to see him in the cozy office tucked away in the more closed grounds of East Jefferson General Hospital, he still makes house calls. Patients have her phone number, and they can call or text her whenever they need as part of her concierge service.

“Twenty years ago everything was like me,” Yager, 63, said from behind an antique desk surrounded by family photos and gifts from patients. “I’m kind of a dinosaur.”

Yager is one of a dwindling group of primary care physicians who have maintained an independent practice instead of joining a larger health care system.

As hospital systems consolidate in Louisiana and across the United States, they bring with them coordinated care with specialists, a streamlined approach to scheduling, the ease of electronic health records, and bargaining power over companies. insurance. At the same time, independent primary care practitioners are on the verge of extinction, and at a cost, some say.

“There are great systems that are in place with these healthcare entities, great ways to track that,” Yager said. “But I think the patient-doctor relationship is disappearing.”

According to the results of a 2020 American Medical Association survey, more than half of physicians are working outside of private practice for the first time since the group began tracking physician employment in 2012.






The coronavirus pandemic has accelerated the trend. In 2019 and 2020, 48,400 physicians left independent practices for larger systems. Hospitals and businesses bought nearly 21,000 practices during this period, and at the end of 2020, 7 in 10 doctors were employees of hospitals or companies, such as private equity firms or insurers , according to a report by the Physicians Advocacy Institute and Avalere. Health.

Rising overhead, increasing administrative requirements, increasing use of urgent care points, and the pull of rapidly expanding hospital systems have combined to reduce the number of these practices. Some of those remaining, including Yager, have turned to membership or “concierge care” where patients pay an annual fee.

In an open letter to Congress last year, the Physicians Advocacy Institute, a nonprofit that advocates for fair payment policies and contracts from payers, said more doctors selling their practices won’t were “no surprise,” given the “high administrative costs that reduce time with patients, onerous regulatory compliance burden and expense, and anti-competitive contracting and payment practices by mainstream insurers and hospitals .







NO.inddocs.adv_787.JPG

A photo of Dr. Alan Yager’s father, Dr. Isadore Yager, who served as East Jefferson Hospital’s first chief of staff in 1971. The photo is next to Alan’s desk in his office on Houma Blvd. at Metairie on Friday, October 28, 2022. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




There are benefits to growth. Larger hospital systems treat a higher percentage of Medicaid patients, who cannot afford the additional annual fees of an enrollment practice. Salaries are often higher initially, some doctors said, and health systems typically deal with taxes, malpractice insurance and other administrative issues.

At the same time, some doctors resent the number of patients they are asked to treat in large systems and the speed with which they are treated. And those who have chosen to remain independent say the trade-offs erode patient trust.







NO.inddocs.adv_788.JPG

Dr. Alan Yager sits at his desk with his dog, Oakley, in his office on Houma Blvd. at Metairie on Friday, October 28, 2022. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




Dr. Ed Lafleur, who opened a private practice in Lafayette in 2004, opted to join a large system in 2011. Part of the talk, he said, was that the hospital system would manage employee and patient issues. other duties so that he can concentrate on medicine. .

But six months into a three-year contract, he wanted out. To make money according to the model of the system, he had to spend 7 to 10 minutes with the patients. There wasn’t enough time to focus on nutritional advice or listen to patient issues.

“I could fix just about anything — runaway diabetes, blood pressure, acid reflux, autoimmune disease, obesity — but to do that takes time,” Lafleur said.

He is back in private practice and uses a concierge doctor model, where he charges patients an annual fee. He spends two hours with patients on their first appointment.

“If I have to go back to seven minutes, I’ll start a lawn service,” Lafleur said.

Challenges

Ka-Yan Tong knows the challenges of owning a private practice.

“On weekends, I go to Sam’s to get toilet paper, I go to get cleaning supplies,” said Tong, a doctor who has been practicing in Metairie for 12 years. “You do everything in private practice.”

And the compensation model generally doesn’t match what she might earn at a large hospital. In the early years, she earned less than during her residency.

It has become more difficult financially for many young doctors to start their own business. In the 1960s, a medical degree today cost the equivalent of about $45,000. In 2022, medical school costs an average of about $230,000, according to research group EducationData. This means that new doctors have thousands of loans when they would need to borrow more to open a new practice. At LSU School of Medicine, a public university, in-state tuition is nearly $33,000 per year. Doctors like Yager paid around $1,800.

Independent doctors also have less help in complying with federal reports. Physicians who treat people covered by Medicare — typically a large percentage of patients — must report health care outcomes or face reduced reimbursement rates.

They also lack the bargaining power of larger systems and face more resistance from insurance companies, said Dr. Devan Szczepanski, who has clinics in Covington and Florida.

“I have at least five extra employees because I got pre-approvals or even fought to get paid for a regular visit,” Szczepanski said.

Tong said she stayed independent for one reason: “freedom.”

She wants to keep her own schedule and manage her time with patients.

“When you work for yourself, you can decide, I want to spend more time with my patients,” Tong said. “So I see fewer patients.”

The concierge model

Dr David Myers, a solo independent practitioner in Metairie, believes that independent doctors have more incentive to keep patients out of hospital than those who work within a larger network.

He sees a lot of patients who come from large systems.

“They feel like a pawn in a giant game instead of having their individual interest front and center,” Myers said.

Some physicians have managed to thrive independently under the concierge or membership model. Yager switched to this model 10 years ago and charges patients $400 a year. Myers and Lafleur are part of a network of independent doctors, called MDVIP, which costs patients between $1,800 and $2,000 a year and includes access to a legal and IT service. The company also helps doctors negotiate rates with insurance companies.

Others work on an adherence model and tailor their practice to what interests patients. In Covington, Szczepanski has a practice that takes traditional insurance. His two membership practices in Florida offer traditional primary care alongside integrative medicine — things like hormonal and nutritional genetic testing.

For Yager, building a personal connection and trust with patients is vital. His father was also a doctor and was one of the founders of East Jefferson General Hospital, which was purchased by LCMC Health in 2020. A portrait of the elder Yager looks at a stack of files in his office son. Yager said his dad used to do house calls in a boat in the bayou — which is the kind of thing that no longer exists.

Yager points to the initial hesitation and then outright rejection of the COVID-19 vaccine as an example of the importance of a personal connection with a family physician.

“People don’t trust health care,” Yager said. “They trust the people who take care of them.”

]]>
How Insider Rates RV and Boat Loans https://pspbook.com/how-insider-rates-rv-and-boat-loans/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 18:35:45 +0000 https://pspbook.com/how-insider-rates-rv-and-boat-loans/ Insider’s experts choose the best products and services to help you make informed decisions with your money (here’s how). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners, however, our opinions are our own. Terms apply to offers listed on this page. If you want to buy an RV or a boat but don’t […]]]>

Insider’s experts choose the best products and services to help you make informed decisions with your money (here’s how). In some cases, we receive a commission from our partners, however, our opinions are our own. Terms apply to offers listed on this page.

If you want to buy an RV or a boat but don’t have the money to do so, a loan could be a great choice for you. There are many lenders to choose from. We review them and their loan offers in reviews and guides that help you make the best borrowing decision possible.

To ensure that we rate each of them equally, we use a rating system that takes into account a range of factors from interest rates and fees to customer support and ethics. We consider the pros and cons of each company and product, comparing them with others that are available so you can decide which RV or boat loan is right for your particular needs.

What We Look For When Rating RV & Boat Loans

We rate all RV and boat loan products in our guides on a scale of 1 to 5. The overall rating is a weighted average that considers seven different categories, some of which are rated more heavily than others. They are:

  • Interest rate (20% of note)
  • Fees (20% of the bill)
  • Term of office (15% of mark)
  • Loan amounts (15% of the note)
  • Maximum vehicle age and authorized use (15% of the score)
  • Customer support (7.5% of score)
  • Ethics (7.5% of grade)

The weighting of each category is based on its importance to your borrowing experience. Rates and fees have the most direct impact on the total cost of your loan, which is why we place the most emphasis on these. Although customer support and ethics are always important, they are not directly linked to the terms of a loan. Therefore, they have the least impact on the overall rating.

Interest rate (20%)

We primarily look at the minimum interest rate offered by a lender to determine its rating. Many RV and boat lenders don’t list their maximum rates, making it difficult to factor that into our rating. We look at how often the floating rate changes and what metrics are used to change rates.

Examples

  • A lender will receive 5 out of 5 if its minimum APR is one of the lowest in the market (around 5.99%) and it keeps its rates relatively stable
  • If a lender has a higher minimum APR but still has low rates (around 6.5%) and changes their rates a bit more frequently, they will win 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders with very high minimum rates that fluctuate frequently will get 1 out of 5.

Fees (20%)

Lenders can charge a variety of fees, from origination fees to late payment penalties. We prioritize lenders that charge little or no fees.

Examples

  • Lenders who charge no fees will get a 5 out of 5.
  • Lenders with minimal origination fees and reasonable late fees will receive 2.5 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 if they charge a hefty origination fee that takes a large chunk out of your total loan amount and late fees that accrue if you’re late on payment.

Term of office (15% of mark)

We see if the company has a variety of repayment terms, with options for borrowers who want to pay off their loans quickly and save on interest as well as those who want to spread their costs over several years. We also look at whether the company sets repayment terms or whether the borrower is able to choose.

Examples

  • A lender will earn a 5 out of 5 if it has a maximum duration of 20 years.
  • Companies whose maximum duration is around eight years benefit from a 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 if they select the length of your term for you from a limited number of options.

Loan amounts (15%)

We also look at the minimum and maximum loan amount for a business. A smaller minimum makes a business more accessible to borrowers who need a small amount of financing for their boat or RV. A high maximum allows borrowers to obtain a more expensive one if they wish.

Examples

  • A lender will earn a 5 out of 5 if he has a minimum loan of at least $10,000 and a maximum of at least $250,000.
  • Businesses with a minimum loan of $20,000 or more or a maximum loan of $100,000 or less get a 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 whether they have very high loan minimums or very low maximums.

Maximum vehicle age and permitted use (15%)

We determine the maximum age of the RV or boat you purchase. We also see if the company will allow you to live in the vehicle full time or if they only approve vehicles for recreational use.

Examples

  • Lenders who have a long maximum vehicle age range (approximately 20 years) and allow all uses of the vehicle will get 5 out of 5.
  • A company that has a slightly lower maximum vehicle age (approximately 15) or only allows vehicles for recreational use will receive a 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 if they have a low maximum vehicle age and only allow vehicles for recreational use.

Customer support (7.5% of score)

We go over the different ways you can contact customer support. For example, we look at whether you can contact someone by phone, live chat, email, or regular mail. We also look at customer service hours and give high marks to companies that offer 24-hour service.

Examples

  • A lender will receive 5 out of 5 if it offers multiple ways to contact it and is open seven days a week for a significant part of the day.
  • A lender with customer support available six days a week and many ways to contact them will win 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 if they have limited ways for you to contact them and are only available during certain hours of the traditional work week.

Ethics (7.5% of grade)

We review the company to see if there have been any scandals over the past three years. We investigate whether the business is known to be racist or sexist towards its customers or staff or has predatory lending practices. We also consider the company’s Better Business Bureau rating.

Examples

  • A lender will receive 5 out of 5 whether it has been scandal-free in the past three years and whether it has an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau.
  • If a company has no scandals and a BBB rating of around B, it will get a 3 out of 5.
  • Lenders will receive a 1 out of 5 whether they have been part of a major scandal in the past three years or have a BBB rating of D or lower.

Our ratings can help you determine which lender is best for you. RV and boat lenders who score high in each category will be our lenders with the highest overall ratings. Nevertheless, consider options with lower overall ratings if they are more suitable for your individual situation.

]]>
Shady Cove businessman, outgoing councilor challenged in writing – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://pspbook.com/shady-cove-businessman-outgoing-councilor-challenged-in-writing-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 07:15:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/shady-cove-businessman-outgoing-councilor-challenged-in-writing-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ From left to right: Jay Taylor, Jim Hubbard and Paige Winfrey After registering for mayor of Shady Cove and then dropping out of the race, Councilman Jay Taylor throws his hat into the ring in an 11th-hour bid to stay on city council. The chief executive of the HVAC company and former planning commissioner declared […]]]>

From left to right: Jay Taylor, Jim Hubbard and Paige Winfrey

After registering for mayor of Shady Cove and then dropping out of the race, Councilman Jay Taylor throws his hat into the ring in an 11th-hour bid to stay on city council.

The chief executive of the HVAC company and former planning commissioner declared himself a write-in candidate because he cannot be on the ballot for council.

He was initially concerned about Mayor Shari Tarvin’s leadership, leading him to declare his candidacy to overthrow her, but backed down when he realized he could be a spoiler and deny Jon Ball a mayoral victory.

Jackson County Clerk Christine Walker confirmed that Taylor’s name will still appear on the ballot for mayor because he missed an opt-out deadline.

Jim Hubbard, former Air National Guardsman and owner of a gas and electric company, who never held elected office; and Paige Winfrey, outgoing councillor, are both running for a four-year term.

Voters will be asked to select two candidates for two four-year vacancies when they fill out their ballots. Only their names will appear on the ballot, but Taylor hopes enough people will write in her name to eclipse one of them.

Jim Hubbard

Hubbard never thought he would go into politics, but council resentment motivated him to run.

“There was an opening where I saw one of them was running for mayor, so I thought, ‘Well, I’ll give it a try,'” Hubbard said. “I think I’m kind of a middle-of-the-road guy. I will not come with my own agenda. I think we have to represent the people in the community and what they want. That’s what I’ll try to do.

Hubbard thinks “every citizen wants water”, and with a city so dependent on wells, he will try to find solutions if elected to council.

“It’s not a problem that’s solved in one or even five years,” Hubbard said. “But something has to be done. Looking at the strategic plan, dated 2001, we are still in the same boat; we are not much better off.

A water-focused volunteer committee that could seek out solutions — and potentially tap into President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan — could do the trick, according to Hubbard.

“A lot of the key to growth is water,” he said.

Hubbard acknowledged that Shady Cove has a lot of empty storefronts, which has been a problem since he moved to the area in 2005.

“I think what we can do is there have been new businesses in town that have been pretty successful, and I think we have to go and see them and get some ideas,” Hubbard said. “(Ask them), ‘What inspired you to start a business here and what can be done to bring other businesses to town?’ Like I said, I don’t have all the answers, but I think some people might.

Fire protection is another big issue Hubbard faces at Shady Cove.

“Shady Cove can do more because right now it’s not up to us to do anything,” he said. “But maybe later, if we can talk to these other communities that got the land from the Bureau of Land Management, that would allow us to come by and start cleaning it up; anything we can do will help. Maybe prune some trees, the underbrush.

Paige Winfrey

Winfrey, who was named to the board in March, said she felt a desire to run.

“I’ve been attending council meetings for three and a half to four years now, so I’ve listened to what’s going on at Shady Cove,” Winfrey said. “I’ve lived here for over 23 years, and it kind of made me want to do more and get involved in improving our little community.”

She mentioned longevity in the community, as well as her husband and children’s love for the city, as the starting point for people to vote for Winfrey. Her husband is Jackson County District 4 Fire Chief Greg Winfrey.

“Our hearts are out for Shady Cove; we don’t want to leave here,” she said. “We are involved in many different aspects of life here, along with other organizations. We want to see Shady Cove thrive. Doing positive things is a big driving force for me. I don’t want to sit and wait for someone else to do something if I can. I want to be part of the solution.

The biggest issues facing Shady Cove, according to Winfrey, are water, internet services and tourism.

Winfrey acknowledges that downtown has its share of empty storefronts, and she said some current business owners could give their stores “a facelift…so we can keep the tourism money flowing.”

As for water, Winfrey pointed to wells in Shady Cove, which are experiencing issues that make water less usable. At a recent conference, Winfrey learned how small towns in Oregon have developed municipal water systems with the help of government grants and loans.

“A large percentage of these loans are forgivable,” Winfrey said. “For me, it’s super exciting; if people can pay a lot less than they pay with a private system and pay off the water company loan, I don’t understand why that’s not something we should all be looking at.

When it comes to internet connectivity, Winfrey said the internet is spotty in her town, with people using personal hotspots for service.

“Every week there are problems,” she said. “It’s quite frustrating.”

Council members, he thinks, could go to a city of similar size and learn how it got broadband connectivity and learn by example.

“There are loans and grants that we just need to be able to get,” Winfrey said.

Jay Taylor

Taylor thinks being a write-in candidate doesn’t make it harder to get elected.

“I’ve done my best to spread the news that I’m not running for mayor,” he said, citing his social media efforts. “On the other hand, I am a little better known to the active citizens of Shady Cove because I sat on the municipal council. I show up at every event that takes place here – that can’t be said by every person who runs.

Taylor noted that a candidate forum he plans to attend will be another opportunity to emphasize his written candidacy.

Of the issues, Taylor thinks the most important to address are: water, fire prevention and trade.

As for water, he would like a municipal water system because Shady Cove is one of the only places without a system.

“I had never heard of this before,” Taylor said. “There’s a reason every city has its own municipal water system; there are advantages to that. We’re just late. With the wells giving way now, maybe now is the time.

Taylor is aware that many properties in Shady Cove are considered to be an extreme fire hazard.

“Everyone in this town has taken steps to make their property defensible against fire, and we are still working on it; it’s an ongoing problem,” Taylor said. “Linked to the fire hydrants in our water system, that would help tremendously.”

He would also like to improve Shady Cove Park, thanks to a suggestion he received from a young girl at a “meeting of concerned citizens”.

“We could set up a volleyball court very easily,” Taylor said.

Taking over as councilor for Tarvin once she becomes mayor, Taylor thinks voters should keep it while giving the council an “overhaul”.

“There have been too many divisions in this last administration,” he said. “The salt keeps pouring in, and that’s just not the way to be for any city council. I am determined to take the high road and cause no conflict or division.

Contact journalist Kevin Opsahl at 541-776-4476 or kopsahl@rosebudmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @KevJourno.

]]>
Court records reveal the outgoing county commissioner applied for a job at a county-funded facility https://pspbook.com/court-records-reveal-the-outgoing-county-commissioner-applied-for-a-job-at-a-county-funded-facility/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 21:37:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/court-records-reveal-the-outgoing-county-commissioner-applied-for-a-job-at-a-county-funded-facility/ Over the past 18 months, allegations against New Hanover County Commission Chairwoman Julia Olson-Boseman have continued to pile up. From an investigation by the North Carolina State Bar into allegedly mishandling client funds — to the alleged $50 million offer to a local nonprofit — residents and officials of the state have all expressed their […]]]>

Over the past 18 months, allegations against New Hanover County Commission Chairwoman Julia Olson-Boseman have continued to pile up. From an investigation by the North Carolina State Bar into allegedly mishandling client funds — to the alleged $50 million offer to a local nonprofit — residents and officials of the state have all expressed their concerns.

Now, court testimony reveals a possible conflict of interest: In late September, Olson-Boseman applied for a job at The Healing Place, the county-funded facility she championed as county president. According to Olson-Boseman’s testimony, she was not qualified for the position of director of the facility, but was told that The Healing Place would “find a place for her” in the organization.

Olson-Boseman also admitted under oath to using drugs and alcohol daily from the beginning of this year until July – and spending almost all of the $118,000 she was transferred from a joint bank account while her family was on vacation in Italy.

WHQR and WECT obtained court tapes where Olson-Boseman deals with two different family matters. While these personal matters are generally not covered, allegations of mismanagement of money, admissions of substance abuse, and possible conflict of interest as chairman of the board of commissioners seeking employment at an institution financed by county money are of public interest. interest.

The place of healing

The Healing Place is a new treatment facility that New Hanover County took out $24 million in loans to build. The facility has been the subject of several rounds of controversy over the past four years, including refoulement when the county has applied for a special use permit needed to build it within Wilmington city limits. There was also frustration, including a commissionerwhen Trillium launched bait and switch, replacing Wilmington-based Coastal Horizons with Kentucky-based The Healing Place, and effectively eliminated physician-assisted treatment (MAT) from the establishment’s approach in favor of l directed abstinence.

Through it all, Olson-Boseman was a strong advocate for the establishment – sometimes citing her own experience of drug and alcohol use, and subsequent recovery, as inspiration to support the establishment based on the ‘abstinence.

Although The Healing Place’s funding structure is somewhat complicated, the county plays a major role, including providing support for 50 of the facility’s 200 beds in the county’s annual budget.

Now, according to Olson-Boseman’s sworn testimony on September 28, she has applied and been offered a position at The Healing Place.

“Yes, I interviewed yesterday for a job at The Healing Place…it’s a new 200 bed facility opening, 100 beds for women and 100 beds for men. The position I applied for, facilities manager, is not what they said – I knew I was not for it, but they said they would be happy they would find me a job. place in this organization. she says.

In an email response to an interview request, Olson-Boseman addressed her application, writing, “I’m trying to get on with my life and find a job doing something I’m passionate about. That’s why I applied for a job at The Healing Place. I have not used my status or my involvement in this process in any way, but I am sure that your reporting will ensure that I will not get this job and this opportunity anyway.

The Healing Place of Kentucky did not respond to a request for comment on Olson-Boseman’s candidacy. None of Olson-Boseman’s colleagues on the board of commissioners responded to a request for comment on a potential conflict of interest.

Financial matters

Finances have played a major role in the controversies surrounding Olson-Boseman. Allegations of mishandling client funds from when she practiced law until draining a joint bank account of around $118,000 in July – judges are now ordering her to tell them where that money went .

The state bar successfully received an order from a Wake County judge asking Olson-Boseman to turn over banking records related to his business account. Now Family Court Judge Elizabeth Keever wants her to provide a record of how she spent the money from the shared account with his wife.

In an attempt to determine what marital assets are at stake in the separation between Olson-Boseman and his wife, Angie Olson-Boseman, Julia Olson-Boseman was also questioned in court during a September 26 hearing on a major salary. which earned him over $800,000. . Olson-Boseman confirmed they were proceeds from her law firm, which she said was closed when she retired in January 2021.

Her attorney, Chris Johnson, asked the court to redact identifying details of the case, which was only identified as a personal injury settlement, but on the stand Olson-Boseman confirmed she had deposited two checks — one for $666,666.66 on Sept. 22, 2021 and one for $161,000 on Oct. 9, 2021 — from cases she described as “connected.” She also said that she has not yet paid taxes on this income.

Olson-Boseman said she spent much of that money on a number of things, including furnishings, repairs and additions, a car, boat, golf cart and other “expenses. personal”.

Olson-Boseman also admitted to taking money from the sale of a boat, a check for $50,000 payable jointly to Olson-Boseman and his wife. Olson-Boseman admitted to depositing the check into his own account without his wife’s signature. When asked if the money was still in his account, Olson-Boseman said it was also spent.

At the September 26 hearing, Olson-Boseman said he had about $700 left, having apparently spent the last of the money in just one month over the summer.

According to court records, attorney Lori Rosbrugh, who represents Angie Olson-Boseman, questioned Julia Olson-Boseman about the levy on her bank accounts. The $118,000 she withdrew from her joint account was transferred to a business account, used to fund her party bus company, Odyssey Party Bus.

“Where is he now?” Rosbrugh asked, referring to money.

“Spent,” Olson-Boseman replied.

“You’ve spent $118,000 since July 25?” Rosbrugh continued.

“More than that, yes,” Olson-Boseman said.

After further follow-up questions regarding the proceeds from the $50,000 boat sale, Rosbrugh asked, “So do you have any money left in any of the [the] accounts that are in your name right now? »

Olson-Boseman replied that he had about $700 left in all those accounts.

“So you went from 118 plus 50 to $168,000,” Rosbrugh asked, “to $700, in a month?”

Olson-Boseman replied “correct”.

At the end of the hearing, Judge Keever ordered an accounting of all funds in all accounts that Olson-Boseman and his wife held in personal or joint accounts from the period between June 1 and August 31. . They had 30 days from September 26. hearing to provide these records.

Relapse

Olson-Boseman went public with her personal substance abuse issues and entered treatment in 2013. However, during a September 28 hearing regarding custody issues, she admitted that she used drugs and oil on a daily basis. alcohol until recently.

A lawyer asked Olson-Boseman if she had used cannabis or drugs containing THC.

“Yes,” Olson-Boseman replied.

“Do you do all these things daily? Is that what you said? asked the lawyer.

“Yes,” she replied again.

“When you use these drugs, would you get to the state where you wouldn’t be able to drive him if you had to,” the attorney asked, referring to his ability to care for his son.

“I have such a high tolerance for drugs that they don’t even really affect me,” Olson-Boseman said.

Olson-Boseman was adamant that she was not drunk with her son, but acknowledged that her daily drug and alcohol use lasted from January until the end of July. She told the court she was now “back in the bedrooms”, meaning a 12-step recovery program.

Again, none of the other four members of the New Hanover County Board of Commissioners responded to requests for comment on concerns about Olson-Boseman’s actions. A New Hanover County spokesperson also declined to comment.

Olson-Boseman declined an interview request to discuss his attempt to seek employment at The Healing Place, his financial troubles, and his drug and alcohol use.

In response via email, she wrote:

I know that because I’m a public figure you all feel you need to investigate the very personal and heartbreaking details of my life, but I feel like I’ve been through enough and it’s time to stop. trying to twist my personal life to sell stories. You don’t have all the facts about the money you’re talking about, but I can’t discuss them because of the current case. I went to treatment in 2013 for addiction and am now back in AA meetings, and I am committed to being sober for my son and making sure I can protect him and be there for him. And I’m trying to move on with my life and find a job doing something I’m passionate about. That’s why I applied for a job at The Healing Place. I have not used my status or my involvement in this process in any way, but I am sure that your reporting will ensure that I will not get this job and this opportunity anyway. Have I made mistakes in my personal life? Yes. I think we all have. But mine are just on display for everyone’s entertainment, it seems. My role as Commissioner has never been compromised, as the media has made it seem, and my commitment to making a difference and helping people has never wavered. But you don’t report all the good things I’ve done, because that doesn’t sell stories.

]]>
Hinckley faces ‘big resignation’ https://pspbook.com/hinckley-faces-big-resignation/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://pspbook.com/hinckley-faces-big-resignation/ Image Maine’s maritime industry leader offers ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunities 40S Picnic Boat 40S Picnic Boat SOUTHWEST HARBOR, Maine, Oct. 18, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hinckley Yachts has set the standard for all aspects of the boating experience since its inception in Southwest Harbor in 1928, and that continues as it continues to is […]]]>

Image

Maine’s maritime industry leader offers ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunities

40S Picnic Boat

40S Picnic Boat

40S Picnic Boat

SOUTHWEST HARBOR, Maine, Oct. 18, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Hinckley Yachts has set the standard for all aspects of the boating experience since its inception in Southwest Harbor in 1928, and that continues as it continues to is about addressing national, regional, and local labor shortages that challenge nearly every business in every industry.

“Let me put it this way,” says Kirk Ritter, the current general manager of Hinckley Yacht Services in Southwest Harbor, Maine. “We have the best team of marine professionals in the industry leading all of our departments, and most have been here for 30 years or more. If you want to live and work essentially across the street from one of the best national parks in the country (Acadie) in one of the most beautiful states in the country and learn from the best of the best, we’d love to hear from you!”

COVID has caused a spending boom for the entire outdoor industry, and the marine industry has been a huge beneficiary of this trend. The surge in new boat orders and boat owners spending more time on the water has led to a dramatic increase in demand for everything marinas do, and an already tight labor market has been tightened even further. .

“We need top carpenters, electricians and mechanics,” Ritter explains, “and not necessarily in that order. Traditionally, we wanted to hire people with experience in the maritime industry, but there just aren’t enough people with experience in those disciplines anymore. If you are a top professional in any of these three professions, we have the team of experts who can teach and train you. That’s why we call it a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to make a career and life change that might not happen again.”

Ritter says there are opportunities in positions across the yard, not just in key business disciplines, but to meet growing customer demand, these three categories are his top near-term priorities. All potential team members with exceptional sales and customer service skills are also always sought after.

“We also do everything we can to keep you here once you join us,” Ritter says. “We have a unique team culture where we work together to help all team members grow and develop, and we do everything we can to support those who wish to take external training programs to further develop their skills.”

Hinckley currently employs 60 people at its Southwest Harbor service center and another 200 at its manufacturing facility in Trenton, Maine. The company would like to increase its in-state workforce by at least 10-15% over the next year and is committed to supporting regional workforce development and New Maritime Trade Schools. -England. To that end, the company announced in April that it was implementing the Hinckley Yachts Student Loan Assistance Program (HYSLAP), an employer-paid student loan program for employees graduating from technical trade programs in post-secondary schools.

“We are very committed to developing the talents of our existing team members,” said Geoff Berger, CEO of The Hinckley Company. “The HYSLAP program will support this, as all of our managers and team leaders do on an ongoing basis by training and teaching our age-old methods on the job. HYSLAP was also developed in close collaboration with Maine’s The Landing School, l ‘one of the best maritime business schools in the country.

The Landing School is one of New England’s premier institutions for marine and yachting career development and is a critical partner to the industry, especially during this labor shortage. unprecedented work. While many of their current students come to the school straight from high school in search of an associate’s degree and to start new careers, an even higher percentage are recent college graduates or “career changers” who are leaving more traditional careers in search of a rewarding lifestyle and work-life balance in a post-COVID world. Careers in the maritime industry can take you all over the world, creating objects of substance and beauty that are part of people’s lives.

“We are thrilled to continue the decades-long partnership with Hinckley Yachts,” said Sean Fawcett, president of The Landing School. “Over the years, many Landing School graduates have established meaningful and rewarding careers at Hinckley, and this recent collaboration through the HYSLAP program is testament to the value that leading boat building and service companies such as Hinckley value effective and relevant education.”

Hinckley is a national and local market leader, and part of what continues to draw people to Hinckley, Maine is the company’s culture and heritage. Economic development professionals and employment experts agree that the Hinckley name is well known nationally and around the world, and just like LL Bean and other iconic Maine brands, it is part of what defines the State. Hinckley owners tend to be “customers for life” and include not only DownEast Mainers and New Englanders, but also pioneers of the new economy for the tech world and figures such as Martha Stewart, Chuck Townsend, David Rockefeller and Roger Penske.

Hinckley’s heritage is forever tied to the culture and brand of Maine, not just because the company was founded there, but because its very essence reflects the values ​​of what it means to be Maine. : hard work, commitment to innovation and excellence, and a love of water and the outdoors that all members of the current SW Harbor Service Center team share. From the company’s first experiments with building fiberglass boats in the 1940s and 1950s to building the iconic Bermuda 40 sailboats in 1959, Hinckley has pioneered many of the industry’s key trends from the 1930s.

“People want to work for winning companies that have demonstrated success, innovation, and leadership,” says Newport, Rhode Island-based executive recruiter Neal Harrell. “We know Maine needs to attract highly skilled workers from out of state to meet the state’s growing demand for economic growth, and Hinckley is a well-known brand that continues to push the envelope on many levels. Hinckley is one of the few brands that helps sell the state.”

###

About Hinckley Company:

The roots of the Hinckley Company run deep in Maine shipbuilding soil. The company, founded in 1928 to build and maintain local lobster boats, has been in continuous business, building classics such as the Bermuda 40 and the Picnic Boat. Henry Hinckley led the way with the Bermuda 40 in the early 1960s when he crafted its stunning lines from a radical new material, fiberglass. This combination of elegant form, material innovation and brilliant attention to finishing detail paved the way that Hinckley has been on in the pleasure boat business ever since.

Today, Hinckley builds Jetboats and carbon/epoxy sailboats from 29 to 55 feet and supports its owners and other boaters with its network of service yards from Maine to Florida. Two other distinguished boat builders, Hunt Yachts and Morris Yachts, were acquired in 2013 and 2016 respectively. For more information, please visit www.hinckleyyachts.com.

About the landing school:

The Landing School offers a top-notch education for men and women who want to pursue a career in the boating industry. The school’s four programs, Wooden Boat Building, Composite Boat Building, Marine Systems and Yacht Design, provide the foundation for a rewarding career in a highly sought-after industry. Founded in 1978 by John Burgess and Cricket Tupper, The Landing School remains committed to its mission of effectively preparing students for careers in the maritime industry. The Landing School is the first school of its kind to be accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Vocational Schools and Colleges. Students can earn an associate’s degree in marine industry technology or a degree in wooden boat building, yacht design, marine systems, or composite boat building. For more information, visit https://www.landingschool.edu.

About Hinckley Yachts Student Loan Assistance Program (HYSLAP):
The Hinckley Yachts Student Loan Assistance Program (HYSLAP) is an employee benefit where the employer makes payments to pay off a portion of an employee’s student loans. Under the program, Hinckley will make payments directly to the employee. Prior to March 2020, student loan repayments of any amount were taxable. This changed with the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act. Employers can now make student loan repayments tax-free (up to the IRS limit) until December 31, 2025, unless future legislation extends the deadline.

The program will help employees repay student loans taken out for post-secondary technical trades programs, such as those offered by The Landing School. Eligible employees include full-time employees who graduated from a post-secondary technical/business program within 12 months of the date the employee first applied for assistance under this policy. New employees begin receiving payments after three months of continuous employment with Hinckley.

Contact information:
Scott Bryant
Vice President of Sales and Marketing
sbryant@hinckleyyachts.com
401 683 7089

Related Images

Image 1: 40S Picnic Boat

40S Picnic Boat in Somes Sound, Maine

Image 2: Hinckley Yacht Services, South West Harbor

Various Hinckley models being prepared for the yachting season.

This content was posted through the press release distribution service on Newswire.com.

Attachment

]]>